Target Name: ACE3P
NCBI ID: G100129123
Review Report on ACE3P Target / Biomarker Content of Review Report on ACE3P Target / Biomarker
ACE3P
Other Name(s): Angiotensin I converting enzyme (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) 3, pseudogene | angiotensin I converting enzyme 3, pseudogene | ACE3

ACE3P: A Drug Target / Disease Biomarker

ACE3P, short for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 3-Positive, is a protein that is expressed in various tissues throughout the body, including the lungs, heart, kidneys, and intestines. It is a key enzyme in the regulation of blood pressure, and has been identified as a potential drug target for various diseases, including heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes.

The protein ACE3P is composed of four subunits, which are encoded by the ACE3P gene. The ACE3P gene is located on chromosome 11, and is responsible for producing the ACE3P protein. The ACE3P protein is a member of the superfamily of ACEs, which are a group of enzymes that belong to the same structural family. These enzymes are responsible for catalyzing a variety of biochemical reactions, including the regulation of blood pressure, as well as the digestion of proteins and the regulation of inflammation.

One of the key functions of ACE3P is its role in blood pressure regulation. ACE3P is responsible for breaking down a hormone called angiotensin II, which can cause blood vessels to constrict and raise blood pressure. In addition, ACE3P is also involved in the production of another hormone called atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), which has the opposite effect and causes blood vessels to dilate and lower blood pressure.

ACE3P has also been identified as a potential drug target for several diseases, including heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes. For example, some studies have suggested that inhibiting ACE3P activity may be a useful treatment for hypertension and heart failure, as it can help to reduce the pressure on the cardiovascular system and improve heart function. In addition, some researchers have suggested that ACE3P may be a potential target for diabetes, as it is involved in the regulation of blood sugar levels.

Despite the potential benefits of ACE3P as a drug target, there are also concerns about its potential drawbacks. For example, some studies have suggested that ACE3P may be involved in the regulation of inflammation, and that inhibiting its activity may have unintended consequences for the immune system. Additionally, there are concerns that ACE3P may be involved in the regulation of cell death, and that inhibiting its activity may have negative effects on cancer cells.

In conclusion, ACE3P is a protein that is expressed in various tissues throughout the body, and is involved in the regulation of blood pressure. It has been identified as a potential drug target for various diseases, including heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes. While there is potential for ACE3P to be a useful treatment for these conditions, there are also concerns about its potential drawbacks, and further research is needed to fully understand its role and potential as a drug target.

Protein Name: Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 3, Pseudogene

The "ACE3P Target / Biomarker Review Report" is a customizable review of hundreds up to thousends of related scientific research literature by AI technology, covering specific information about ACE3P comprehensively, including but not limited to:
•   general information;
•   protein structure and compound binding;
•   protein biological mechanisms;
•   its importance;
•   the target screening and validation;
•   expression level;
•   disease relevance;
•   drug resistance;
•   related combination drugs;
•   pharmacochemistry experiments;
•   related patent analysis;
•   advantages and risks of development, etc.
The report is helpful for project application, drug molecule design, research progress updates, publication of research papers, patent applications, etc. If you are interested to get a full version of this report, please feel free to contact us at BD@silexon.tech.

More Common Targets

ACER1 | ACER2 | ACER3 | Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases (ACC) | Acetylcholine Receptors (Nicotinic) (nAChR) | ACHE | Acid-Sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) | ACIN1 | ACKR1 | ACKR2 | ACKR3 | ACKR4 | ACKR4P1 | ACLY | ACMSD | ACO1 | ACO2 | ACOD1 | ACOT1 | ACOT11 | ACOT12 | ACOT13 | ACOT2 | ACOT4 | ACOT6 | ACOT7 | ACOT8 | ACOT9 | ACOX1 | ACOX2 | ACOX3 | ACOXL | ACOXL-AS1 | ACP1 | ACP2 | ACP3 | ACP4 | ACP5 | ACP6 | ACP7 | ACR | ACRBP | ACRV1 | ACSBG1 | ACSBG2 | ACSF2 | ACSF3 | ACSL1 | ACSL3 | ACSL4 | ACSL5 | ACSL6 | ACSM1 | ACSM2A | ACSM2B | ACSM3 | ACSM4 | ACSM5 | ACSM6 | ACSS1 | ACSS2 | ACSS3 | ACTA1 | ACTA2 | ACTA2-AS1 | ACTB | ACTBL2 | ACTBP12 | ACTBP2 | ACTBP3 | ACTBP8 | ACTBP9 | ACTC1 | ACTE1P | ACTG1 | ACTG1P1 | ACTG1P10 | ACTG1P12 | ACTG1P17 | ACTG1P20 | ACTG1P22 | ACTG1P25 | ACTG1P4 | ACTG2 | Actin | Activating signal cointegrator 1 complex protein | Activin receptor type 2 (nonspecifed subtype) | ACTL10 | ACTL6A | ACTL6B | ACTL7A | ACTL7B | ACTL8 | ACTL9 | ACTMAP | ACTN1 | ACTN1-DT | ACTN2 | ACTN3 | ACTN4